Subtitle

"BROWN SEAWEED EXTRACT & U-FUCODIAN" BIOAVAILABLE...

Japanese researchers discovered that a polysaccharide known as Fucoidan, found in kombu and other types of brown seaweed (wakame, mozuku, and hijiki), causes various types of established cancer cell lines to self-destruct. BIOFILAM (MODIFIed LAMInaria, or MODIFI-LAN) was developed and named in Russia by Russian scientist Maslyokov Yuri Pavlovich in 1991 (PATENT RU# 2030885 and RU# 2019981). He worked in the State Rehabilitation Institute, where victims of the Chernobyl nuclear catastrophe underwent treatment. The healing qualities of seaweed had been known for centuries, so the Russian government instructed scientists to find an effective and powerful remedy for the radiation poisoning of that particular population. After trying out various forms of algae, one type yielded the best scientific data for this purpose. It was the brown seaweed known as Laminaria japonica, which grows wild in the northern Pacific Ocean off the coast of uninhabited seashore far to the east of Russia. One of the main qualities of Laminaria Japonica is its high content of alginates, which are enhanced by the extraction process used to produce BIOFILAM. Alginates are the most effective organic elements that enable the human body to get rid of heavy metals and toxins. Not all "algae" have alginates; blue or green algae does not. According to scientific testing, only laminaria japonica brown seaweed does! The unique patented methods of low-temperature extraction, as well as the quality of this seaweed, are key. BIOFILAM has up to 55% of the highest quality alginates. What is U-Fucoidan? About 4 percent of the total dry weight of many types of brown seaweed consists of a polysaccharide known as Fucoidan. Fucoidan is a sulfated polysaccharide that possesses a complex structure. Its chief components include a sulfuric esterified L-fucose, and the trace elements of galactose, xylose, and glucuronic acid.Working cooperatively, Takara Shuzo's Biomedical Research Laboratories and the Research Institute for Glycotechnology Advancement were able to confirm the presence of two different types of Fucoidan molecules in brown seaweed.

Posted by Sonia on May 14, 2016 at 8:20 PM 913 Views

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